Angus Grant Art

Paddling, Painting, Printing

Everything that goes into an Angus Grant painting


Leave a comment

What’s in a painting?

I’m painting towards a new exhibition in the summer (more about that exciting news soon!) and I’ve been thinking about all the different elements that contribute to each piece.

It’s always nice to start new work and as a bit of a distraction, I thought it would be interesting to show you some of the things that I use when I’m working. It was fun to have a go at a flatlay – playing Tetris was not a waste of time!

WhatsAPainting_key

1 Canvas – This is stretched linen, a bit fancier than canvas. Not out of the shiny plastic wrap yet.

2 Shirt sleeve – This is my painting shirt and I always clean my brushes on my left arm. It used to be my outdoor shirt but they all turn into painting shirts eventually.

3 Sketchbook – essential for my ideas and notes. This one is about fishing but I’ve got a few on the go, and loads of filled ones in a box under the bed.

4 Pastels – These are great for underpainting and sketching. I usually sketch out the painting first with pastel and use white paint to fix the colours.

5 Pencils – for sketching in my sketchbook. Don’t use them so much on the canvas.

6 Airbrush and acrylic ink and Indian ink – I use the airbrush for lots of different things, including fluffy clouds and applying thin transparent “glazes”. It is really useful for layering colour.

7 Whizzer – for mixing up the acrylic ink to make it smooth enough to use in the airbrush.

8 Brushes – you need a varied range for the different tasks in landscape painting. The wide ones, like the Skyflow brush, are brilliant for blending big blue skies. The fan brush is great for painting grass and trees. And the thin one are vital for all the wee details.

9 Acrylic paints – these are lovely acrylics by Vallejo. I like them because they are highly pigmented. And they smell good enough to eat!

10 Plate – I use this for mixing my paint. This one is well-used.

11 Sponge – for stippling and applying texture to trees and shrubs. I also use old brushes for this.

12 Toothbrush – useful for flicking paint to create flowers, water spray and bubbles.

13 Palette knife – for flicking bigger dollops of paint.

14 Masking tape – always useful when you need a crisp straight line.

15 Water pot – for cleaning the brushes.

16 Frame – the final piece of the jigsaw. I often make the frames before I think I’ve finished. Sometimes you can’t tell if it’s done until it’s framed.

17 Varnish – this is good quality artists’ UV varnish to keep the painting safe.

18 Headphones – I like to listen to audiobooks when I paint. It’s nice to have something to occupy my ears while I work. My Audible account is full of stories and will testify to how much painting I have done!

19 Coffee mug – an Angus Grant Art one of course! And it’s always many more than one mug of coffee per painting.

Pretty sure I’ve forgotten something…

 

 

Metallic Morlich painting by Angus Grant, Loch Morlich painting


Leave a comment

Landscapes are a skoosh

If you’ve ever wanted to learn how to paint a landscape, now is your chance.

As part of the grand re-opening of the 1896 Gallery in Boat of Garten. I’ll be teaching a wee workshop there at the end of March.

‘Landscapes are a skoosh’ will cover basic acrylic techniques to build up the layers of a scene in order to create a beautiful painting. I’ll also show you how to use an airbrush and get you spraying paint on the canvas in no time.

It’s a one day session on March 31 – that’s all the time you’ll need. The workshop costs £75 and includes materials, a light lunch and refreshments. But spaces are limited, so booking is essential. Contact info@1896gallery.com to reserve your space.

Angus Grant paintings for sale


Leave a comment

Superfly is open!

The paintings are up, the sun is out and I’ve got ice lollies in the freezer for a lucky few visitors. Superfly is now open at Logie Steading.

I’m in the Long Room, which is beside the Farm and Garden Shop. It’s a great space to show paintings and I’m really excited to be here.

Claret Shrimp painting by Angus Grant


Leave a comment

Countdown to Superfly

Just 10 days to go before the launch of the exhibition and I’m busy with a range of different tasks: painting, framing, publicity, etc, etc.

But I am really looking forward to showing my new work. The fishy paintings are always a pleasure.

You can now see a wee preview of the paintings on my Gallery page. I’m interested to hear what you think.

Landscape painting upside down, Angus Grant


Leave a comment

Painting upside down

I’m still working away on my fishy pictures. Now that I’ve laid down the main colours, I’m starting on the details – the trees, mountains, water, rocks and fish (of course). This is the hard work of the painting and I’ll take my time to get it just right.

…Which leads me to a wee tip to help you. If after a while you decide to repaint the sky, turn your canvas upside down to prevent pesky blue drips ruining the lower part of your work.

As you can see in the picture below, I repainted the sky on this view of Loch Morlich after I painted in lots of detail in the foreground. Skies are easy to redo (more on those another time) but imagine how annoying it would be to see my lovely mountains and salmon ruined.

upsidedown_web

Rynettin painting in progress, Angus Grant


1 Comment

A new look at a bright bothy

This is one of my latest works in progress in my new railway poster series. It’s a new take on one of my favourite views in the Cairngorms, at Rynettin, near Nethy Bridge.

I love the way the red roof of the hut stands out against the green field in this new work. It’s also one of my most popular paintings so it’s a great challenge to paint it in a different way. This one’s nearly finished now.

You can see an earlier version at the top of the page.

Rynettin painting in progress

Work in progress

Mike's Trout by Angus Grant


2 Comments

Some trout portraits

Finished these fishy portaits and am looking forward to sharing them at a new exhibition next month.

They’ll be part of the Creative Cairngorms exhibition at the Moray Art Centre, Findhorn, from April 4-30. It’s my first time showing work here but I visited recently as part of Joanna Wilson’s exhibition preview and it’s a great space.

And of course I’ve got a few more portraits in the pipeline…tight lines…

Painting of a fish swimming away from a brightly coloured lure


Leave a comment

Not this time

Not-today

There’s a nice ripple on the surface of the water. You’ve thought carefully about the fly to use, taking time to match the wee beasties on the surface. You’ve laid down your line, casting so carefully it might have been a cobweb touching the surface of the water. You slowly retrieve your line crossing the exact spot you saw that trout rise….. and absolutely nothing happens.


Leave a comment

Layers of a painting

underpainting

I often like to build up a painting using layers of colour.  In the sunshiney one I last posted I started of with a rough purple layer. This will make the shadows look nice and rich as it complements the yellow which is the main colour in this painting.

underpainting2

I’ll then build up layers of colour allowing wee bits of the base (purple) layer to show through which will tie the whole image together.

The finished image is below.

Angus grant fine art painting sunrise

Along the A9