Angus Grant Art

Paddling, Painting, Printing

Golden trout


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A golden belly

I caught the most beautiful trout today.

I went to Loch Morlich early this morning (early for a Sunday anyway). It was a break from DIY in the shed and the chance to do a little fishing. The loch and the beach were quiet and there were a just few fishermen camping at the far end. Jane went for a walk with Sparky the dog and left me to it.

But it wasn’t all relaxation, honest. Paddling on the kayak gave me a chance to plan my next project. And I’ll admit that catching a few fish has also helped.

You know that fishing is a passion of mine and now I’m thinking about making the fish the heroes of the paintings, not just the shapes in the shadows. Something like fishy portraits.

Today was a chance to get up close and personal with them – I got three trout and a couple of pike. Not that you’d really want toย  get too close to them. Too many sharp teeth!

But back to that beautiful trout.

You’ll see it on the picture below but it had a lovely golden belly. Seems a shame to eat it, but we will.

Sparky made friends with it too, as you can see.

 

 

Silver invicta


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Box of fishing flies

Been busy with the colouring in pencils, putting together a collection of pictures for the upcoming exhibition, Beyond Reasonable Trout. Think I’ll put them on some mugs too for that all important brew, after a hard evening’s fishing!

Beyond Reasonable Trout


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Beyond Reasonable Trout

C-_Users_Pupil_Desktop_Beyond-reasonable-trout

The title painting for my upcoming summer exhibition at Grantown Museum July 2-10. Powering up through the water after a wee black fly, glinting in the light….. there’s a fight coming. It’s not a massive painting but it’s one that makes me smile.

Painting of a fish swimming away from a brightly coloured lure


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Not this time

Not-today

There’s a nice ripple on the surface of the water. You’ve thought carefully about the fly to use, taking time to match the wee beasties on the surface. You’ve laid down your line, casting so carefully it might have been a cobweb touching the surface of the water. You slowly retrieve your line crossing the exact spot you saw that trout rise….. and absolutely nothing happens.